What saved TikTok from getting banned?

Who saved TikTok from being banned?

A federal judge’s preliminary injunction means the app stores can continue offering the video app for downloads for now. A federal judge on Sunday granted a preliminary injunction against a Trump administration order to ban the viral video app TikTok from U.S. app stores, in a reprieve for the Chinese-owned service.

How did TikTok get saved from being banned?

Chinese-owned short-video app TikTok has been saved from being banned from Apple and Google storefronts, App Store and Play Store, at least for a week after “recent positive developments” as the company is in talks with Oracle and Walmart. TikTok has been saved with a possible deal with Oracle and Walmart.

Is TikTok still bad to have?

Since TikTok represents highly successful Chinese tech, many of the privacy worries stem from a political standpoint, going as far as to call the app a threat to national security. While these arguments are unfounded, claims have been made that the app could be covert spyware.

Is TikTok still a bad app?

TikTok is relatively safe despite some valid concerns; most cybersecurity experts consider it no worse a risk than other social media apps. TikTok is an enormously popular social media site in which users create and share short-form videos. The app has come under scrutiny for data mining and privacy concerns.

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Which countries have banned TikTok?

The Chinese video sharing app has been blocked in Pakistan. TikTok has been banned in Pakistan for “immoral/indecent content.”

Can TikTok see you through your camera?

Why Every Social Media Platform Is Blending Into One Big Mush. However, TikTok’s privacy policy states they “collect certain information from you when you use the Platform including when you are using the app without an account”. This “technical information” includes your IP address, mobile carrier, timezone and more.

Is TikTok bad for your brain?

Researchers know that the brain is plastic; in other words, it changes over time, rewiring and creating new connections. So the idea of lots of quick videos “training” your brain to respond shorter and shorter content isn’t that far-fetched. But experts tell Bustle that TikToks are actually safer than they seem.